Dietary flavanols may help lower body fat

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Dietary flavanols may help lower body fat


Dietary flavanols may help lower body fat Cocoa, apples, grape seeds, red wine, and some other food sources contain high levels of flavanols (FLs), also known as flavan-3-ols, which have some health benefits. Is related to. Previous studies suggest that FL-rich foods have great potential for managing cardiovascular health, improving cholesterol levels, and increasing glucose tolerance. Scientists are now using mouse models to study the relationship between food intake and lipid metabolism in FL. The results of the study provide new clues that may one day be a useful treatment for cardiovascular disease and obesity. Flavanols (FLs), also known as flavan-3-ols, are one of the most commonly consumed flavonoids in the American diet.
These compounds are found in a variety of foods, beverages, natural and processed foods, and herbal supplements.
Several studies have shown that ingestion of FL-rich foods provides antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, cardiac prophylactic, antibacterial, antiviral, and neuroprotective properties.
However, the exact mechanism by which FL provides protection has long been unknown to scientists.
Recently, Japanese researchers have embarked on expanding their scientific knowledge of FL. A
mouse model was used to examine the ability of ingested FL to stain white adipose tissue brown.
Adipose tissue or body fat is an essential organ for maintaining the body’s energy homeostasis and is composed of white adipose tissue and brown adipose tissue. White adipose tissue acts as an energy store, while brown adipose tissue is important for maintaining body temperature.
Scientists call the phenomenon of white turning into brown adipose tissue fat browning. Here, the white adipose tissue that stores energy is converted to brown adipose tissue, which breaks down blood sugar levels and fat molecules.
This is an important therapeutic event as excess white adipose tissue accumulation is associated with the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease. In addition, the conversion process also produces heat that helps maintain body temperature.
Their findings are published in the journal Nutrients. Hypothesis test
Medical News Today contacted Naomi Osakabe, a professor at the Graduate School of Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, who is the lead author of the research, in order to understand the motivation of the research.
She states:
“Flavan-3ol-rich foods (cocoa, apples, etc.) are known to reduce the incidence of obesity and its complications and prevent heart disease, but flavan-3ol. It is unclear why such beneficial effects are obtained because of insufficient absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Through activation of sympathetic nerves. Therefore, flavan-3ols can promote beige fat. We conducted this experiment to prove this, assuming it was sexual. ”
To test their hypothesis, researchers conducted two independent experimental sets.
In the first experiment, scientists randomly divided the animals into two treatment groups. One group received a single dose of cocoa-derived FL diet and the other group was not fed a FL-rich diet and acted as a control.
For both groups, the research team collected 24-hour urine samples. This was done to measure the effect of control and FLrich diets on catecholamine (CA) levels before and after oral administration.
In the second experiment, researchers divided the animals into two treatment groups. In contrast, one group was repeatedly fed a cocoa-derived FL diet for 14 days, while the other group was not fed a FL-rich diet. At the end of the
treatment period, researchers collected white and brown adipose tissue from both treatment groups. They did this to reduce the long-term effects of the sympathetic nervous system “SNS”. investigate. Activities related to the structure and function of these organizations. “Amazing” results
Researchers write that some parts of previous work influenced this new work. Earlier, they observed that a single oral dose of a FL-rich diet elicited a stress response in animals. This activated SNS and significantly increased catecholamine levels.
Catecholamines (CA) such as dopamine, adrenaline, and norepinephrine are released from social media during stressful events and help guide the body’s fight-or-flight response to these events.
In this study, researchers concluded that increased CA levels could be used to assess social networking activity.
Therefore, when another study showed that activation of SNS induces fat browning, researchers set out to further test FL.
In the first experiment, researchers found that over a 24-hour period, the amount of CA excreted by the control group was about the same before and after eating the control diet.
However, they found that a single dose of a FL-rich diet in the test group significantly increased CA levels over a 24-hour period.
In the second experiment, the team noticed increased expression of tan protein markers in the brown adipose tissue of FL-fed animals. In addition, they also observed the development of beige adipose tissue within white adipose tissue in response to SNS activation.
Based on these results, the research team concluded that oral administration of FL activated SNS and was associated with fat browning.
Surprisingly, they also found that “the effects of flavan 3ols [FLs] were found not only in subcutaneous fat but also in visceral fat.”
This finding is important because excess visceral fat increases the risk of developing obesity. Therefore, FL has the potential to open up new investigative tools and new potential therapies for cardiovascular and obesity-related disorders.
However, there is still a long way to go from animal testing to human treatment.

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